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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 957 (some duplicates have been removed)
at 9:00 and a number two tomorrow morning on c-span-3. next up, hearing looking and syria. over 5000 people have died in syria, including 300 children, as protests and violent clashes continued. the united nations human rights council says syria should be investigated by the international criminal court. >> the subcommittee will come to order. as has been well documented, the human rights being -- human rights violations being perpetrated in damascus are horrifying. we have documented some of the rest of calling him widespread human rights abuses witnessed in -- some of the of the most appalling and widespread human rights abuses witnessed in the past decade. abuse, murder, sexual violence, torture, and the abuse and murder of children. witnesses report the torture, abuse and rape of children no more than 15. one military defector stated that he decided to defect after witnessing the shooting of a 2- year-old girl by an officer who affirmed that he did not want her to grow into a demonstrator. the english language does not have words strong enough to adequately condemn the horrifying
. according to the u.n. high commissioner of human rights, the civilian death toll in syria now exceeds 5000 the number of children killed as more than 300. no responsible nation can sit by and allow this to testable display of depravity to continue. today's hearing however was called to examine u.s. policy. several months ago, the subcommittee of the privilege of hearing assistant secretary spelman and posner discuss the obama administration's human rights policies towards iran and syria. since that hearing, the administration has taken a number of steps on syria for which it deserves credit. although it took far too much time and at least 1900 dead syrian citizens, the administration has finally come out and called for a share all assad's departure from power on august 18. it also implemented sanctions against the government of syria and various high-ranking syrian regime authorities, many of which have been mirrored by our allies abroad. unfortunately i fear this is not enough. syria currently stands on the precipice of a full scale civil war. recent reports suggest that the ranks of the
children killed in the last few months in syria. he is not the first and he will not be the last. so many children have been killed in syria, shot by snipers, killed after being arrested by the regime. some have been tortured. so many children have died it risks becoming mundane. a murder that doesn't even make headlines anymore. that should not be. so tonight, we're leading off this broadcast with video of the death of this little boy. now some of you will say we should not show this video. i understand that. it is sickening. it is hard to watch. it is horrific. but we believe what is even more horrific is dying in silence. murder that is then covered up by lies. lies from a dictator who says it isn't happening, a dictator who says we're not pulling the trigger on sniper rifles that kill children. we're not shooting on funerals. he says it's not happening and yet every day, in hundreds of homemade videos, we see it happening. you will see it happening tonight. the little boy's only crime, it seems, was being at home in syria in the middle of a war being waged by a brutal dictator against
tensions in syria with a surprising denial of president assad that he ordered a deadly crackdown on protesters. >> brown: and censer michels reports on the discovery of a so called goldilocks planet. not too hold, not too cold, maybe just right to support life. >> it will be hard to learn too much more about the potentially habitable planets any time soon since it's 600 light years away. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's naur. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the secretary of health and human services has waded into the politically charged issue of birth control for younger girls. in a very pub
in syria, the international community ramps up pressure on the assad regime. >> now, warmer temperatures have meant less sea ice. >> a legendary broadcast that issues the warning on climate change and the impact of it is having on our lives. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and also around the globe. 8.6%. remember that figure because you will be hearing a lot of it from the white house. that is a number that unemployment fell too. this is a glimmer of good news for the u.s. economy and brings unemployment down to its lowest level in two and a half years. no wonder president obama is smiling. >> merry christmas, everyone. >> what a christmas gift the president has got. it is not exactly wonderland but getting this comfortably below 9% is a boost. the shoppers dug into their purses and stores took on extra workers to help. the result, a little economic fairy dust. mr. obama knows that the trend will not last if congress does not act. >> we need to keep that growth growing. that means that congress needs to extend payroll tax cuts for working americans. congress needs to renew our
protests and more deaths in syria. we will not leave until the deal is done. french president nicolas sarkozy and german chancellor angela merkel ahead of europe's crunched summit. it is midday in london, 7:00 a.m. in washington, and 4:00 in the afternoon in moscow, where security forces are still patrolling the streets in what appears to be a massive show of force after two days of protests in the wake of the weekend's election, which saw a vastly reduced majority for putin's party. the opposition says he would be out of office altogether were it not for systematic vote rigging. is this the start of a new mass movement? i should just say -- in the last few minutes, we've heard that the former soviet union leader has asked for the results of the election to be annulled. to discuss this with me, a former dissident who was imprisoned by the communists in the 1980's and now works for human rights center memorial. thank you for being with us. you have been a dissident from communist times. do you see anything new in the latest protests? >> [inaudible] another new point is that i think, th
in the last few months in syria. he is not the first and he will not be the last. so many children have been killed in syria, shot by snipers, killed after being arrested by the regime. some have been tortured. so many children have died it risks becoming mundane. a murder that doesn't even make headlines anymore. that should not be. so tonight, we're leading off this broadcast with video of the death of this little boy. now some of you will say we should not show this video. i understand that. it is sickening. it is hard to watch. it is horrific. but we believe what is even more horrific is dying in silence. murder that is then covered up by lies. lies from a dictator who says it isn't happening, a dictator who says we're not pulling the trigger on sniper rifles that kill children. we're not shooting on funerals. he says it's not happening and yet every day, in hundreds of homemade videos, we see it happening. you will see it happening tonight. the little boy's only crime, it seems, was being at home in syria in the middle of a war being waged by a brutal dictator against his own people. a
of cancer and pollution. in syria, an advance team of observers from the arab league has arrived in the country amid reports of increasing violence. the full deployment is sent to oversee an arab league peace plan that calls for the withdrawal of troops from the street and the release of all prisoners. at the same time the violence continues and in the latest incident, four civilians have been killed in the central city of homs. what if any pressure can be brought to bear against the assad regime? that is where the questions i posed to the former u.s. ambassador to syria. what can the arab league monitors realistically do? >> we have to note that syria had refused the monitors. they wanted to put so many conditions on it that it would have been worthless. now we know when the arab league threatened to go to the security council, that is when the regime settled. they agreed to 150 monitors coming in. no one who knows this regime believes that these monitors will be given any real freedom to go where they want when they want. the syrians will show them what they want them to see. t
in nuclear-powered? welcome to "gmt." also in the program -- new moves to pressure syria as the u.n., russia signals willingness to condemn bashar al-assad. bradley manning, the u.s. soldier accused of stealing secrets to wikileaks is about to make his first court appearance. it is midday in london, 4:00 p.m. in moscow and 9:00 p.m. in tokyo where the prime minister told his nation the fukushima plant is now stable. nine months after the earthquake and tsunami which devastated the area, he said it is now in -- the plant is now in cold shutdown. but the disaster is likely to haunt japan for decades. roland berger reports from tokyo. >> explosions -- since explosions shook the nuclear plant, the reactors were pushed into meltdown after being engulfed by a huge tsunami. now the government announced that workers at the power station achieved their goal. it is in a state of cold shutdown and the leaks of radiation have been substantially reduced. >> since i took office, i have been saying that for japan to be reborn, fukushima has to be saved. the nuclear power plant accident needed to be stabili
to steal nuclear program. >> the united nations says the growing unrest in syria has sent them into civil war. rewriting the rules of the eurozone. at the french president unveils a new blueprint for the future. 12 noon in singapore. >> welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the world. this is "newsday." >>> u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton has begun formal talks with the pro-democracy leader aung san suu kyi. mrs. clinton said the u.s. about would be willing to ease sanctions if further progress is made towards political reform. a warning that this report contains flash photography. >> an american secretary of state shaking hands with the burmese president. hillary clinton and aung san suu kri, face-to-face, unthinkable a few months ago, but things may be changing and this isolette, repressive country. the burmese president laid out his policy for reform. the american diplomat gave some praise, but said a lot more work was required. she offered incentives to do more and the foreign minister scored an invitation to visit washington. but this is just the beginning of a
? prime minister maliki, i'd like to ask you the question about syria. why haven't you demanded that assad step down given the slaughter of his people? >> first of all, the prime minister and i discussed syria, and we share the view that when the syrian people are being killed or are unable to express themselves, that's a problem. there's no disagreement there. i have expressed my outrage in how the syrian regime has been operating. i do believe that president assad missed an opportunity to reform his government, chose the path of repression and has continued to engage in repressive tactics so that his credibility, his capacity to regain legitimacy inside syria, i think, is deeply eroded. it's not an easy situation. i expressed to prime minister maliki my recognition that given syria's on iraq's borders, iraq's in a tough neighborhood, that we will consult closely with them as we move forward. but we believe that international pressure, the approach we've taken along with partners around the world to impose tough sanctions and to call on assad to step down, a position that is increasingly
the arab league got a firsthand look today at open rebellion in syria. the arab officials journeyed to the battered city of homs, where the military pulled back and up to 70,000 protesters turned out. we begin our coverage with this report from independent television news, narrated by alex thomson. >> reporter: the arab league delegation, possibly all that now stands between syria and civil war, hearing it straight from the people of homz. they beg the observers to come to a district that has seen heavy fighting here. they're led by this man. and the observers seem to mean business. they went. they got here, too. "we want the president executed" they chant. tens of thousands gathered to protest here peacefully against the regime. the regime which had already pulled heavy armor out of the ancient city very publicly before the observers arrived. and after that, volleys of tear gas from the syrian army trying but failing to stop people reaching today's mass rally in town. >> we withdrew early but the rest of the time we're hidden in government buildings in the area. we feel very optimi
that everything old is new again. dick crantz, fox 5 news. >>> coming up next, another deadly day in syria as arab league monitors arrived in the country to help restore the peace. we have the latest next. gary? >>> great day today. changes for tomorrow. rrow.  >>> in florida, three people were killed in a helicopter crash. a mayo clinic heart surgeon and technician were on their way to gainesville to pick up a heart when the chopper went down. the pilot was killed in the crash. there is no word what caused it to go down. >>> to syria, the arab league is getting involved in the deadly uprising. 23 more deaths were reported from intense shelling at the center of the country. hundreds of arab league monitors are arriving to help restore the peace. help land vitter has the latest. >> reporter: more deaths are being reported as the violence intensifies in syria. the arab league says the turmoil has gone on far too long and special teams are being sent in to help prevent further bloodshed. >> our role and the role of the arab league is to help the sir ran government get out of the crisis. >> report
that to a facebook account? i don't know. >>shepard: in syria, reports of killings and kidnappings and bodies in the street. the man who shot president reagan wants to live among the rest of us outside the mental hospital, and a doctor says, he is ready! what makes scottrade your smartphone's most powerful trading app ? total access - to everything. from idea to research to trade. including financials, indicators and real-time streaming quotes. whether you check your investments every day or every minute, our app can take them from thought to trade. at scottrade, seven-dollar trades are just the start. try our powerful mobile app. it's another reason more investors are saying... i'm with scottrade. i wish my patients could see what i see. ♪ that over time, having high cholesterol plus diabetes... or high blood pressure... or family history of early heart disease... can put them at increased risk for plaque buildup. and they'd see that it's more important to get their cholesterol where their doctor wants. and why for these patients, when diet and exercise alone aren't enough, i prescribe cre
and that right now we would all be focusing on the instability in syria. >> rose: where do you think it is today in a broad sense terms of its power to dominate 2012? >> the arab spring, charlie. >> rose: yes. >> yeah, we talked about this because you and i were together the night mubarak fell in tahrir square. one of the things i remember about being there th week in egypt is that some day i would love to design a journalism course just aut that week. because i don't remember if we talked about in in cairo, charlie but my rule in that week has been my rule ever since, is that whenever you see elephants fly, shut up and take notes. i felt like in cairo elephants were flying. we were seeing things, when everyone tells me the arab spring is going to be this, going to that be it is going to be wonderful, internal. you didn't see it coming, what makes you think you know where it's going, okay. shut up and take notes. and so that's really my overarching, you know, attitude right now, charlie. what strikes me is several people have pointed this out there was a saying after the russian revolution, demo
but it is raising fears tonight of more violence to come. >>> in syria, the streets are bloody tonight, with up to 50 dead in the last day and the country appears to be spiraling towards civil war by the hour. abc's martha raddatz reports. >> reporter: it started in darkness. a terrifying volley of gunfire that began one of the bloodiest 24 hours since this revolution began to force out syria's deke tictator, bashir a assad. this morning, with weapons still crackling and tanks thundering by, people were running for their lives, children looking for cover. some, too late. bodies of dozens of anti-government protesters who had been kidnapped were in the streets. thousands of miles away secretary of state hillary clinton met with syrian opposition groups. >> they need to be assured that syria will be better off under a regime of tolerance rather than on the whims of a dictator. >> reporter: clinton is also sending our ambassador robert ford, back to syria, after pulling him out for his safety. clinton says he will be a witness to assad's brutality as syria slides closer into an all-out civil war.
. that is later in the grapevine. up next, the rocky road to peace in syria. >> shannon: in world headlines the trial of former egyptian president hosni mubarak resumed in cairo. the 83-year-old mubarak was taken to courthouse in ambulance. he is charged with complicity in killing 800 protesters earlier in year and could face the death penalty if convicted. >>> a brawl erupted at churches of nativity at the west bank. happened as orthodox monks were cleaning the facility. palestinian police broke it up. similar fights have taken place at the church in the past. >>> iranian exiles in iraq accepted a deal to move 400 residents to camp liberty by the end of the year. state department spokesman says no decision has been made rather to remove the group on the list of the terrorist organization. they fired a block at exile today. no casualties were reported. the state department is urging syria to provide access to arab league monitors. leland vittert reports on the effort to end the government crackdown on dissent. >> gunfire and arrest tillly barrages -- artillery barrages to take cover on the
. that is later in the grapevine. up next, the rocky road to peace in syria. [ male announcer ] cranberry juice? wake up! ♪ that's good morning, veggie style. hmmm [ male announcer ] for half the calories -- plus veggie nutrition. could've had a v8. for many, nexium helps. relieve heartburn symptoms caused by acid reflux disease. osteoporosis-related bone fractures and low magnesium levels have been seen with nexium. possible side effects include headache, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. other serious stomach conditions may still exist. talk to your doctor about nexium. >> shannon: in world headlines the trial of former egyptian president hosni mubarak resumed in cairo. the 83-year-old mubarak was taken to courthouse in ambulance. he is charged with complicity in killing 800 protesters earlier in year and could face the death penalty if convicted. >>> a brawl erupted at churches of nativity at the west bank. happened as orthodox monks were cleaning the facility. palestinian police broke it up. similar fights have taken place at the church in the past. >>> iranian exiles in iraq accepted a deal
in syria's bloody spiral of violence. suicide car bombs went off in damascus. tonight's images are especially graphic. the two car bombings left behind charred metal, shattered buildings and body parts. the big question, who's behind these deadly attacks? syria's government-run news agency say the attacks carry the blueprint of al qaeda, quote. cnn can't send a correspondent into syria. but our reporter is monitoring the situation from cairo tonight. the syrian government says al qaeda -- i don't believe the pronouncements by the syrian government. what do we know? >> reporter: john, as you said, the syrian government blaming al qaeda. but the opposition groups we're speaking with in syria, the activists there, they're laying the blame at the doorstep of bashad. they say it's convenient at a time when arab lead monitors in syria that bashad would make these claims. in this ten months the uprising has been going on, he's said repeatedly he and his troops are fighting terrorists, even though the international community is condemning he and his regime for the violence there, they
, egypt, libya and yemen and, also, the ongoing events in syria and bahrain. our speakers today are david ottaway to my left, he's a senior scholar at the woodrow wilson center and a former cairo bureau chief for "the washington post". we have the bios of the speakers are distributed, so i'll be very brief. david's last paper as part of our occasional paper series was saudi arabia in the shadow of the arab revolt. we have a few copies left. they are outside. we urge you to pick one on your way out. our second speaker is hen ray barkey -- henry bar key, a former fellow at the wilson center, he's professor of international relations at lehigh university, and i just received a copy of his latest book, "iraq: its neighbors and the united states," which he co-edited with phoebe moore and scott levin si. our third speaker is trita parsi. he's the president of the iranian -- the national iranian-american council, a former public policy scholar at the wilson center, and his upcoming book, "a single roll of the dice: obama's diplomacy with iran," will be coming out in the new year, and we have pla
of syria has clung to power in the face of protests. it's estimated 4000 circassians have died in unrest. in an exclusive interview with barbara walters, the president denies he ordered the deadly crackdown on the government protesters. >> not by your command? the crackdown was without your permission? >> there's a difference between having a policy to crack down and -- no government in the world kills its people. >> he admitted some officials made mistakes but contended his forces are fighting militants, drug smugglers and terrorists and not innocent civilians. you can see more of the interview tonight after this newscast. >>> 70 years ago today, the japanese attacked the pacific fleet at pearl harbor. more than 2400 service members died and the attack. the attack brought the united states into world war two. in hawaii and washington, ceremonies were held to mark the anniversary. at the u.s. navy memorial, uss arizona, a wreath serve as a quiet reminder on pearl harbor day. this is downtown washington. more than 2400 sailors who died. local veterans' survivors to part in a pa
't seeing anything frightening in the streets of homs or other parts of syria. of course, this is raising some eyebrows saying there are only ten of you in each hot spot and you are being acompacompanied be syrian government. >> that's right, hala. we were told observers would fan out to other citiy ies and we hd that in hama there were protests and clashes earlier in the day. now, we're being told, in fact, those visits were postponed for logistical reasons and causing more concerns among the activists and many of them are really convinced that what the syrian government is showing these observers is just a charade. it's not the real picture of what's going on there in syria right now. we heard yesterday that while observers were in the city activists and residents said crackdowns were still going on and thousands of protesters that were in places in the neighborhood there being fired upon with live ammunition and tear gas trying to disperse the crowd. when we spoke to arab league monitors earlier today and asked them, they said, you know, reports being written up and being delivered to
. >> in a and a in a few moments a hearing on u.s. policy toward syria. for each of the commissioners, do you believe that employs, professional staff of the nrc have experienced intimidation, hostile or offensive conduct on behalf of the chairman, by the chairman, anything that would be considered to be intimidating, hostile or offensive by the chairman, any professional staff experience that? vs. >> yes. >> yes. >> yes. >> ladies and gentlemen that is the definition of a. russ: . i hope that we can all agree that is why we voted in the statute. the united nations estimates more than 5000 people have been killed in protests against the government of syrian resident bashar al-assad. up next the house foreign affairs subcommittee hears about these administrations syrian policy from the state department's release coordinator. this is an hour and a half. [inaudible conversations] the subcommittee will come to order. i want to wish everyone good morning and i want to welcome all of my colleagues to this hearing on subcommittee on the middle east and south asia. and the chairman. as has been well-document
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 957 (some duplicates have been removed)